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Rep. Boebert Defends her District from a Democrat Landgrab

February 26, 2021

After a year of restrictive lockdowns and regulations impacting our daily lives, the last thing the people of Colorado’s Third District need is a Democrat land grab.

Washington, DC - U.S. Congresswoman Lauren Boebert (CO-03) spoke on the House Floor and stood up for the people of her District by fighting against H.R. 803, a Democrat landgrab that would lock up 510,000 acres of Colorado’s Third Congressional District.

Congresswoman Lauren Boebert (CO-03) stated: "The people of Colorado's Third District deserve a voice in land use decisions that impact their daily lives, but career politicians in Congress want to drown them out with a partisan landgrab. H.R. 803 is an extreme package that will kill jobs, limit outdoor recreation, prevent public access, exacerbate wildfire challenges, stifle responsible energy production and lockup 3 million acres of public land. Even though local stakeholders will be harmed dramatically by these bills, no swamp politician bothered to ask the people for real input, and they did not consult with my office before trying to shut down my district. After a year of overly restrictive lockdowns and regulations on our daily lives, the last thing communities in my district need is further restrictions imposed by government limiting what they can do on public lands. Denver politicians should focus on their own district and stay out of mine."

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Background:

Today, Rep. Boebert voted against H.R. 803, an extreme package comprised of 8 bills that would kill jobs, limit recreation opportunities, prevent public access, exacerbate wildfire challenges, prevent responsible energy production and lockup approximately 3 million acres of federal land. Roughly 550,000 of those 1.5 million acres that would be shut down by these new wilderness designations are in Representative Boebert’s district.

Representative Boebert authored and sponsored 11 amendments to protect her constituents from this job-killing bill that seeks to keep the American people from utilizing their public lands. She also worked with her colleagues to lead 9 other amendments that she cosponsored to fight this massive landgrab. More on these amendments can be found HERE.

Stakeholders that opposed H.R. 803 include:
American Energy Alliance, American Farm Bureau Federation, American Forests Resource Council, American Loggers Council, Archuleta County, Arizona Cattle Growers Association, Arizona Farm Bureau, Arizona Power Authority, California Farm Bureau, Center for Energy & Environment, Cheyenne County (Colorado), Coalition of AZ/NM Counties, Colorado Consulting Foresters, Colorado Farm Bureau, Conservatives for Property Rights, Dolores County (Colorado), Douglas Creek Conservation District, Federal Forests Resource Coalition, Freemont County (Colorado), Golden Vertex Corp., Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, Grant County Cattle Growers Association (New Mexico), Independent Petroleum Association of America, Industrial Minerals Association – North America, Less Government, Mesa County (Colorado), Montezuma County (Colorado), National Mining Association, National Stone Sand and Gravel Association, New Mexico Federal Lands Council, Protect Americans Now, Public Lands Council, Public Lands for the People, San Juan Trail RidersWashington Farm Bureau, West Slope Colorado Oil & Gas Association, Western Energy Alliance, White River Conservation District, Yavapai County Cattle Growers. 

 

Stakeholders that have voiced their support for one or all of Rep. Boebert’s amendments include:
American Energy Alliance, American Lands Council, American Loggers Council, AMPUA, Archuleta County, Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association, Arizona Farm Bureau, Arizona Liberty (Sedona), Arizona Power Authority, AZ Deer Association, Citizens Against Government Waste, Center for Energy & Environment, Cheyenne County, Citizens for America (Sedona, AZ), Colorado Snowmobile Association, Colorado Off Highway Vehicle Coalition, Colorado Consulting Foresters, Colorado Farm Bureau, Conservatives for Property Rights, CREDA, Denver Lumber Co., Douglas Creek Conservation District, enCore Energy Corp., Golden Vetex Corp., Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, Grant County Cattle Growers' Association (New Mexico), Group 11 Technologies, International Mining Association – North America, Irrigation & Electrical Districts Association of Arizona, Laramide Resources, Ltd (Laramide), Less Government, Mohave County Supervisor, Montezuma County, Montrose County Commissioners, National Mining Association, New Mexico Business Coalition (NMBC), New Mexico Cattle Growers Association, New Mexico Federal Lands Council, Off-Road Business Association, One Voice, Protect Americans Now, Public Lands for the People, Rio Blanco County Commissioners, Rio Grande Foundation, Trails Preservation Alliance, United Four Wheel Drive, United Snowmobile Alliance, Veritas Research and Apache County Supervisor, West Slope Colorado Oil & Gas Association, Western Energy Alliance, White River Conservation District.

Courtesy of the House Committee on Natural Resources:

H.R. 803 is a package of eight bills that creates nearly 1.5 million acres of new wilderness (the most restrictive federal land use classification), permanently withdraws 1.2 million acres from mineral production, designates more than 1,200 miles of wild, scenic, and recreation rivers, expands nearly 110,000 acres of national monument land and adds more than 400,000 acres of recreation, conservation and special management areas in four western states. It would also create new management burdens instead of allowing agencies to focus their resources on what they already own.

The biggest concern in many of the affected western states is the increased threat of catastrophic wildfire that will result from these new wilderness areas and wild and scenic river designations. H.R. 803 will effectively restrict forest management across wide swaths of federal lands in three states that rank in the top 10 nationally for severe wildfire threat, including California and Colorado, which rank first and third, respectively. Additionally, some wilderness areas in the bill are designated in the wildland-urban interface, posing a direct threat to life, property, and forest health for nearby communities.

In fact, many of the lands under consideration in this legislation do not even meet the basic characteristics to be considered wilderness. Instead, the bill arbitrarily designates areas as wilderness and wild and scenic rivers, despite official testimony provided by the relevant land management agencies that many of these designations are inappropriate and not recommended.